{Carrot Fritters with Cashew Aioli – The Whole Pantry}

I have 4 shelves full of cookbooks at home.

I still have my very first cookbook that I got in home economics class way back in Switzerland. Then, there are several Jamie Oliver classics, River Cafe, Bread Making Bibles, Stephanie Alexander’s massive book and several Raw and  Paleo cookbooks.  And most recently, whole food/vegan cookbooks by the likes of Lola Berry and Belle Gibson. Each cookbook depicts my cooking evolution, interests and cooking trends. Until a few months ago, I was firmly in the paleo camp. Bread is my great weakness, which is not surprising really. I was born and raised in Switzerland, land of the cheese and most wonderful bread. But I don’t do well on wheat and feel so much better without minimal grains in my diet.

carrot fritters

I have tried to eat vegan for a few months a couple of years ago, but found it too hard to pull off while my family refused to hop on that bandwagon with me. And I was not really committed to giving up dairy and eggs just yet. I have been following a paleo diet for a couple of years, and loved it. I even got into the cauliflower rice and made paleo breads and wraps. The husbo loves meat and so do the kids, so it was easy to cook tasty meals for everyone. We are very diligent in sourcing ethically produced meat and organic eggs and also managed to find fresh raw milk.

I love exploring different cooking styles and am very open to different schools of thought around nutrition and health. In fact, I spend a lot of time reading and researching everything health and nutrition related. So I would not label the way we eat and live anymore. A nourishing whole food diet is not restrictive but open to different ideas and flexible. It is based around the same principles of eating to nourish our bodies, saying no to processed, sugar laden and packaged food. It is ethical and ecological and most closely to what our bodies were designed to eat. Everybody is different and it is important to listen to your body and personal values.  One approach does not fit all. You might ideologically lean towards a vegetarian/vegan diet, but your body just simply does not thrive without animal protein. Or you might love meat, but find it hard to digest, making you feel bloaty and lethargic.  Like the ancient Ayurvedic tradition explains, different body types thrive on different foods and cooking styles. The secret really simple. It is to be open, flexible and intuitive. By combining your body type and personal ideology, you work out what works best for you, your family  and your environment.

 Not that long ago, I came across some information and videos on the the dairy industry. The whole business of mass produced milk is scary and if you dwell on the greater picture long enough it is hard to ignore the impact our desire for dairy product  is having. With respect to dairy, the fact that thousands of calfs are being slaughtered as byproduct of the industry is enough to make you stop and think and maybe look in to alternatives .  If you want more info on this topic, have a look at this video. We only consume about 1 litre of milk a week, along with some cheese, so it wasn’t too hard to try something new. Yes, I will still occasionally by yoghurt, and when in Switzerland, I enjoy a great variety of locally produced cheeses. I like the having  choices.

Postscript 16/1/15 -> thank you to the lovely Eva, owner of my local Health Food shop for clarifying some points re the slaughter of calfs in the dairy industry: 

Hi Alex,
Biodynamic Farms – like Paris Creek Dairy – do not slaughter their calves.

‘Every calf stays with its mother for the first few days. Then the calf joins other calves in a special calf yard and the mother goes in before milking to feed her calf.

A calf will get fresh milk direct from its mother or another mother cow for several weeks.

Managing director Ulli Spranz says the female calves grow up to become milkers and the bull calves are sold’.

I’ve emailed Biodynamic marketing requesting confirmation on their Demeter Milk, but as far as I’m aware, all milk and cheese in the Biodynamic/Organic industry do not slaughter their calves.

This makes it even more paramount that we choose organic/biodynamic produce whenever we can, but especially when it comes to the treatment of our animals.

These days you can find amazing cashew based cheeses at the health food store. I made some cashew aioli and cashew sour cream, both which turned out really well. Fritters are a great school lunch, and we often have enough leftovers that they show up at dinner again. These carrot fritters are from my latest cook book love, ‘The Whole Pantry’ by Belle Gibson (check her out on FB). Her cookbook is right up my alley at the moment, so I will be featuring some more of her recipes as I trial them.

Usually, I would make a mayonnaise to go with fritters, but today I was keen to give the cashew aioli a try. We all loved it (except son no 2, but that is nothing new). It goes well with grilled chicken, on a cracker or with roasted veggies chips too.

Carrot Fritters {makes 12}

  • 4 carrots
  • 4 spring onions
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbl coconut flour
  • cumin/chilli
  • salt and pepper
  • coconut oil for frying

Cut the carrots into even pieces and steam until tender. Once cooled down, mash them with a fork and blend with the chopped spring onions, egg and flower. Season to taste. Let the mix rest for 10 min in the fridge. Shape into small flat discs and toss them in sesame to coat. Fry in coconut oil until brown and crispy.

Cashew Garlic Aioli

  • 1/2 cup of cashews, soaked for a few hours
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 tsp each of dijon and seeded mustard
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • Salt and pepper

Blend the soaked cashews with the rest of the ingredients in a blender (Vitamix) until very smooth and creamy. Season to taste. Will keep in the fridge for up to 4 days.

 

These fritters will come in handy once school is back on. I love them cold too, along a filling salad. Yum!

Enjoy!

Alex

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “{Carrot Fritters with Cashew Aioli – The Whole Pantry}

  1. Eva says:

    Hi Alex,
    Biodynamic Farms – like Paris Creek Dairy – do not slaughter their calves.

    ‘Every calf stays with its mother for the first few days. Then the calf joins other calves in a special calf yard and the mother goes in before milking to feed her calf.

    A calf will get fresh milk direct from its mother or another mother cow for several weeks.

    Managing director Ulli Spranz says the female calves grow up to become milkers and the bull calves are sold’.

    I’ve emailed Biodynamic marketing requesting confirmation on their Demeter Milk, but as far as I’m aware, all milk and cheese in the Biodynamic/Organic industry do not slaughter their calves.

    Like

    • deliciousalex says:

      Thanks Eva, I really appreciate this update. I have added your info to the post. When I wrote the post and then seeing the video, I was aware that this was a practice in the mass produced dairy industry and not independent dairy farms like Paris Creek. I should have made that distinction clear. I have added your info to the post for clarification. Thank you!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s